Deck of Cards Slider Workout

This deck of cards slider workout is a fun way to switch it up! Each suit corresponds to a different slider exercise and the number tells you the reps.

For today’s deck of cards slider workout, you apply the same rules as last week’s to four new exercises. Side note: It’s by complete accident that I’m dressed like a deck of cards in this post. 😉

Deck of Cards Workout (Slider Exercises)


If you don’t have sliders, you can use a dish towel on hardwood floors or paper plates on carpet. If you’re in the market for a pair, I use these double-sided sliders (on sale for $14) that work on both hardwood and carpet.

You’ll need a deck of cards for this workout. There are also smartphone apps for deck of cards workouts you can download if you want to take this to the gym. Shuffle the deck and you’ll flip one card over at a time until you’ve gone through the entire deck. Each suit corresponds to a different exercise and the number of the cards tells you how many reps to do.

Face cards = 10 reps
Aces = 11 reps
Joker = 15 reps, exercise of your choice

As with all workouts, make sure to warm up beforehand. This 5-minute warm up is a great one if you need some guidance!

This deck of cards slider workout is a fun way to switch it up! Each suit corresponds to a different slider exercise and the number tells you the reps.

Deck of Cards Slider Exercises

CLUBS – Lunge Slide to Single Leg Bear | Start in a low lunge with your right foot forward, knee bent to 90 degrees and stacked over the ankle. The ball of your back left foot should be planted on a slider. Hinge forward at the hips so that the weight of your torso is slightly forward, over the target right leg. This will allow you to keep your back foot light. From this starting position, slide your back left foot forward, bending the knee in and staying low on your right side. Slide it back out behind you into the starting position.

Bring your hands to the ground and extend your right leg back behind you in a single-leg plank. Keeping the right leg hovering and your hips at shoulder height, bend the left knee in and then slide the leg back out into a plank. Step the right foot forward between your hands and lift your torso up to the starting low lunge position. That’s one rep. Complete the designated rep number on the right and then left.

DIAMONDS – Marching Forearm Pike | Start in a forearm plank position with your feet on sliders. Keeping your legs straight and heels lifted, pike your hips up into the air as high as you can. Lower them back down to a plank position. Do a marching plank, pressing up to hands one arm at a time and then lowering back down to forearms.  1 pike + 1 march = 1 rep. 

SPADES – Squat Jack to Heel Click | This is the only exercise not requiring the sliders. Its purpose is to provide cardio blasts throughout the workout. Start in a low squat position with feet wider than hips’ width. Staying low, jump your feet in together in a narrow squat and then back out wide. From here, jump up, tapping your heels together midair and landing back down in a wide low squat. That’s one rep.

HEARTS – Snake Crunch to Side Plank Rotation | In a plank position, feet on sliders, hands stacked under shoulders on an exercise mat, cross your right foot in front of the left and drop your heels so that you’re heel-to-toe with toes pointing towards the left. This is your starting position. From here, start bending your knees in towards your left elbow, sliding your feet forward. When you’re in as far as you can go without lowering the hips, slide the feet back out, straightening your knees back into your starting position. Release your left hand from the floor, opening up into a side plank. Return it to the floor. That’s one rep. Complete the designated rep number on the right and then left.

This deck of cards slider workout is a fun way to switch it up! Each suit corresponds to a different slider exercise and the number tells you the reps.

WEARING | Booty by Brabants leggings // Puppies Make Me Happy Pugs ‘N Roses tank (this style is sold out, but they have lots of other adorable stuff for fellow dog lovers!)

Alright, that’s all for me today. Hope your week is off to a great start! 

Inner Thigh Workouts Won’t Give You a Thigh Gap

Sharing some truth bombs about the current obsession with having a "thigh gap".

^Anyone else’s’ Mom have a Suzanne Somers thigh master back in the day?? LOL

One of the most frequent workout requests I get is for one targeting inner thighs. Normally with workout requests, I add them right to the list and do my best to have them created and posted within the month. I find myself putting off the inner thigh workout, however, because I get the feeling the popularity of the request has something to do with this thigh gap craze.

I don’t want to make assumptions, and am sure some people just genuinely are looking to strengthen this muscle group. And for that reason, I’m absolutely going to put together some adductor workouts. But for those who are thinking inner thigh workouts = thigh gap, I just want to share my thoughts and some facts about the topic that I hope are helpful.

In sharing the info below, I’m in no way suggesting you should strive for a gap between your thighs (as will become clear as the blog post goes on). The term honestly makes me cringe a little. Yet here I am. Writing an entire post about it.

The Truth about “Thigh Gaps”

Not everyone can achieve a thigh gap.

Whether we like it or not, not everything is within our control (hi, genetics!). You can be the most petite of petites and still not have a gap between your uppermost thighs if your hips are narrow. So the idea that this would be a beauty standard to which we all try to aspire is just ridiculous. Who even decided this was a thing?? We come in different shapes and builds; we store excess weight in different areas of our body; and we use our bodies in different ways depending on the activities we love.

I'm sharing some facts about the thigh gap craze.

And with all that being said, let’s also not forget that some thigh gaps in pictures are just there because of the way the person is posing. If I stand regularly with my ankles touching and good posture, I don’t have a thigh gap. But if I stick my butt out, tilt my pelvis forward and internally rotate my thighs … boom. So maybe that Insta-famous chick whose legs you’re coveting is just posing at a drastic angle–you have to take social media with a grain of salt and can’t let it make you feel bad about yourself.

Working out is an important piece, but the fix you’re looking for probably lies in your diet.

I don’t think a thigh gap should be your goal, but it’s helpful to talk about the general way in which we approach body parts that we’ve deemed “problem areas”. My intent in sharing the below information isn’t to be like “Hey guys, this is how you get a thigh gap!” but to explain in general how weight loss works, should that be a *healthy* goal of yours.

So let’s break down a “thigh gap” and assume it’s not due to an anterior pelvic tilt (a postural muscle imbalance that can often happen if you have tight hip flexors): It’s a combination of thin (ish) thighs and wide (ish) hips. So reducing the size of your thighs (aka losing weight) would be the way to get there. Now, don’t get me wrong, working out is an integral part of the process, but the biggest influencer is what you’re eating. Any time you’re talking about losing weight, it’s about 70% diet and 30% exercise (that’ll vary by person).

Muscle is more dense than fat (weighs more, takes up less space), so you absolutely want to do strength training, but that needs to be paired with a healthy diet of nutrient-dense foods eaten in reasonable portion sizes. Otherwise, you’re not going to be able to see the majority of that hard work you’re putting in at the gym.

So if you see some bullshit clickbait workout on Pinterest titled “Thigh Gap Workout” or “The Best Workout for a Thigh Gap” please regard it as garbage.

I get questions like this a lot: “Will this core workout help me lose my love handles?” or “Will this quad workout give me thinner thighs?” And it doesn’t exactly work like that. Yes, exercise plays a role. But I can’t overemphasize how important food is.

You can’t spot reduce.

Working out your thighs doesn’t mean you’re going to lose weight specifically from your thighs. Doing a million crunches won’t make you lose weight just from your stomach. You can target where you build strength, but not from where you lose fat.

Let’s say you burn 3,500 calories in a week during your workouts. That’s equal to about a 1-lb weight loss. That one pound isn’t going to be lost from the area which worked the hardest. If you burned the entire 3,500 calories doing glute work, you’re not going to lose one pound of fat directly from your butt. You might lose some from that area, but it really just depends on our individual bodies and how our weight tends to be distributed.

Don’t let beauty standard trends affect how you feel about your body.

I know, I know. Easier said than done. But beauty trends are just that: trends. And like all other trends, they come and go. Being waif thin was “in” then J. Lo burst on the scene and having a big butt was “in”. Remember in the early 2000s when everyone would over-pluck the shit out of their eyebrows because that was “in”? Now we’re all penciling and even tattooing on more brow because the bigger and bolder the better. Already, I see the thigh gap talk growing quieter (thank the lord), and while I’d idealistically love for our society’s idea of beauty to just revolve around things like kindness, health and happiness, I’m sure some other physical trend will take its place.

I'm sharing some facts about the thigh gap craze.

Even if you can and do achieve certain physical markers deemed beautiful by society, I promise you those alone can not make you feel fulfilled. If you’re unhappy with yourself when your thighs touch, you will not suddenly radiate joy with a gap between them. There’s nothing wrong with caring about your appearance–I care about mine!–the issue lies when your self value is completely defined by it.

I realize that as a thin white woman, I’m not exactly the most powerful messenger for championing body diversity, but it’s still important to me that I talk about it on the blog. The distance between your thighs has absolutely nothing to do with your worth. Just focus on being the best version of you. Maybe your thighs touch because they’re strong AF and you’ve been training them consistently for years. That’s something to be celebrated!

So with all that being said, I am going to share a workout targeting the inner thighs soon. Not to help anyone achieve a thigh gap, but to help us strengthen our adductors. Let’s focus more on what our bodies can do and less on what they look like.

Deck of Cards Workout (Bodyweight Exercises)

Deck of Cards Workout: Bodyweight Exercises - each suit corresponds to a different exercise and the number tells you how many reps to do. Flip over one card at a time until you make your way through the entire deck.

I’m going to start each week in April by sharing a deck of cards workout on the blog. This first one is all bodyweight exercises, but I’ll be incorporating equipment into the others (sliders, dumbbells, kettlebells). If you haven’t heard of this structure, it’s a really fun way to switch things up!

I’m not going to put a YouTube version of these workouts on my channel because unless you went through the whole thing at the exact same pace as me, it’d be a pain–you’d have to pause or fast forward the video after each card was turned over. Doesn’t make sense! I will have a video preview though so that you can see the exercises in action. These will be posted to my Facebook page, Instagram and embedded here. And for all my YouTube subscribers–don’t worry! I’m going to still post other workouts in video format throughout the month in addition to these.

Deck of Cards Workout (Bodyweight Exercises)


All you’ll need for this workout is a deck of cards. There are also smartphone apps for deck of cards workouts you can download if you want to take this to the gym. Shuffle the deck and you’ll flip one card over at a time until you’ve gone through the entire deck. Each suit corresponds to a different exercise and the number of the cards tells you how many reps to do.

Face cards = 10 reps
Aces = 11 reps
Joker = 15 reps, exercise of your choice

As with all workouts, make sure to warm up beforehand. This 5-minute warm up is a great one if you need some guidance!

Deck of Cards Workout: Bodyweight Exercises - each suit corresponds to a different exercise and the number tells you how many reps to do. Flip over one card at a time until you make your way through the entire deck.

Deck of Cards Bodyweight Exercises

CLUBS – Surfer Get Ups | Start laying on your stomach with hands by your side. Squeeze your back and glutes to lift your chest and hands off the ground. Lower your hands back to the ground by your rib cage. From here, you’re going to explosively press up and jump into a low squat with one foot in front and the other staggered behind (think of a surfer jumping up on the board to catch a wave). From here, bring your hands back to the ground as you jump your feet back into plank lower your body to the ground with control. Repeat from the top, this time landing in low squat with your other foot in front.

DIAMONDS – Bicycle Sit Ups | Start laying on your back with your hands lightly behind your head, elbows bent out to the sides and chest open. Engage your abs, pulling your bellybutton down to the floor as you lift your legs off the ground about six inches to a hover. This is your starting position. From here, bend your right knee in towards your chest as you crunch your left elbow across to meet it, lifting your back off the floor like a twisting sit-up. Your left leg should remain outstretched in a hover as you do this. Slowly return back to the starting position and continue, crunching in the same direction the entire time. The goal is to keep the legs off the ground the whole time, but if you need to modify, your left heel can quickly rest on the floor in between reps. Complete the full number of reps on the right and then the left.

SPADES – Jump Tucks | Jump up into the air, using your core to pull your knees up towards your chest. Lower them quickly in time to land. You’ll want to bend your knees, sinking into a squat to prep for the jump, and you’ll land this same way, sinking into a squat to absorb the landing. As you jump up bring your hands in front of your rib cage and try to hit them with your knees.

Low(er) Impact Modification: Jump Squats. If you have a history of knee pain or are otherwise at risk of injury with high-impact movements, do jump squats instead of jump tucks. The landing is gentler.

HEARTS – Hovering Fire Hydrants | Start on your hands and knees in a tabletop position, hands stacked under shoulders, knees stacked under hips. Plant the balls of your feet on the floor and lift your knees to hover a couple inches off the floor. Keeping your right leg in that 90-degree angle, lift that knee out and up in a wing motion (like a dog lifting to take a pee), opening up at the hip. Bring it back in close to the starting position. As you do these, pay attention to your core: You want a straight spine, protecting the low back by pulling your abs in tight the whole time. You also want your hips to stay right around shoulder height, so keep your supporting leg at a hover; resist the urge to straighten your stationary knee. Complete the full number of reps on the right and then the left.

Deck of Cards Workout: Bodyweight Exercises - each suit corresponds to a different exercise and the number tells you how many reps to do. Flip over one card at a time until you make your way through the entire deck.

WEARING | leggings c/o Terez // tank c/o Aurum

It’s been a while since I’ve posted a deck of cards workout, but I’ve got a bunch from the archives on this page you can check out.